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6:10 Set Appropriate Page Lengths

Relative Importance:

Relative Importance rating of 3 out of 5

Strength of Evidence:

Strength of Evidence rating of 3 out of 5

Document Type: Guideline


Topic:

Page Structure - General


Guideline:

Make page-length decisions that support the primary use of the webpage.


Comments:

Use shorter pages for landing pages and navigation pages, or any page that requires quick browsing. Use longer pages for uninterrupted reading, to match the structure of a paper document (e.g., news releases), or to make pages convenient to download and print.


Sources:

  • Bernard, M., Baker, R., & Fernandez, M. (2002). Paging vs. scrolling: Looking for the best way to present search results. Usability News, 4.1. Retrieved November 2005, from http://psychology.wichita.edu/surl/usabilitynews/41/paging.htm.
  • Evans, M. (1998). Web Design: An Empiricist’s Guide. Unpublished master’s thesis. Seattle: University of Washington. Retrieved May 2003, from http://response.restoration.noaa.gov/webmastr/webdesgn.pdf.
  • Lynch, P.J. & Horton, S. (2002). Web Style Guide (2nd Edition). New Haven, CO: Yale University Press. Retrieved November 2005, from http://www.webstyleguide.com/index.html?/contents.html.

Good Example:

A shorter page is used for this navigation page so that most content is visible without scrolling. 06_10_good_example1This page is longer but the headers make it scannable.06_10_good_example2This page provides information that a user may read so a longer page is appropriate.06_10_good_example3

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